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ENG 101 - Writing Your Way Through WWU

Prerequisites & Notes: May not be taken concurrently with ENG 100. GUR: ACOM

A writing course designed to prepare students for college-level creative, critical, and reflective writing. Because writing looks and works differently in different contexts, this course teaches the rhetorical competencies that students need to write across multiple disciplines. The course introduces students both to the processes of building and analyzing ideas, and to ways of communicating those ideas in context-specific genres for targeted audiences. This course has the immediate goal of preparing students to succeed in their writing at Western, but it will also serve them personally and professionally. Students needing to satisfy Block A of the communications section of the General University Requirements, which ENG 101 does, are required to do so prior to completion of 45 credits. Students with a 4 or 5 AP score are encouraged to take this class so they can learn to adapt their test-taking skills to college coursework.

OVERRIDES / CAPACITY OVERRIDES ARE NEVER GRANTED FOR ENGLISH 101. English 101 is capped at 24 students due to the constraints of the actual physical space. Please see Course Basics for more information about ENG 101.

 

ENG 110 - Writing, Designing, Remixing with Western Reads

22042 MWF 8:30-9:50 KAITLYN TEER

In this computer-mediated writing course, students respond to the Western Reads text by constructing and designing different kinds of print, visual, and oral texts. This course is recommended for freshmen.

Required texts: Tulalip From My Heart, Harriette Shelton Dover

 

ENG 201 - Writing In Humanities

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101 or 4/5 AP English Language Exam. GUR: CCOM

Advanced instruction and practice in writing using ideas, texts and questions from a specified topic in the humanities. Areas and focus vary with section.

21001 MWF 8:30-9:50 DONNA QUALLEY

Researching and Retelling Fairy Tales: Fairytales have been continually adapted, remixed, and retold in various ways for different audiences for centuries. Part of the magic of these oral, literary, and cultural texts lies in the ways they provide glimpses into the human experience. What do fairytales tell us about our diverse histories, values, fears, and dreams? How might these seemingly "simple" and familiar stories provide a window into our sense of cultural and social identity? How do we define fairytales and how do fairytales define us? In this writing and research course, we’ll examine how scholars in the humanities might approach the study of these stories: What might they make of a story like Little Red Riding Hood, for example? What questions would be interesting to folklorists, storytellers, poets, artists, musicians, historians, anthropologists, literary and cultural critics, feminists, folklorists and philosophers? How would they pursue research into these stories of human experience?

We will begin our inquiry by looking closely at different retellings of a familiar fairytale. Then, you will each choose a popular fairytale from a selected list to study, research, and write about throughout the quarter. You’ll look at the ways your tale has been represented and retold for different audiences (children, young adults, and adults) in different cultures, during different times, and through different media. You’ll look at what other writers and scholars have to say about your tale. We’ll spend a good part of our class time in the computer lab  working with different writing moves. Major writing projects include a many-layered researched inquiry essay and your own imaginative retelling of the fairy tale you have studied."
    
TEXTS: Little Red Riding Hood Uncloaked: Sex, Morality, and the Evolution of the Fairytale, Catherine Orenstein

22061 MWF 1:00-2:20 EMMA LEVY

Robots and Cyborgs in Popular Culture: Robots and Cyborgs are no longer just the stuff of Science Fiction. The evolution of various technologies has brought and will continue to bring inevitable and irrevocable changes to notions of identity, embodiment, and reality. As technological systems such as social media, artificial intelligence, robotics, and virtual reality continue to evolve, it has become clear that the traditional demarcations between human and machine are no longer adequate to the realities of 21st century existence. In light of this, it is imperative to ask important questions about how a move into a more technologized world will transform our culture. In this writing and research course, we will do just this. This class will center on questions such as: How do robots and cyborgs blur the lines between human and machine? How do we reflect on what it means to be human by thinking about its own oppositions? Can human codes of ethics be applied to machine bodies? How will laws have to change to accommodate new machinic life forms? How will robots and cyborgs fit into or subvert the economic, racial, and gender hierarchies of our culture? What is the root of our deep anxiety about robots and cyborgs?

In this course, we will look at varying representations of the robot and attempt to theorize and reframe our relationships to robots, cyborgs, and other technologies that transform embodied experience. The primary text we will be working with is the 2016 HBO series Westworld. This series is set in a futuristic simulation of pre-industrial America, where wealthy patrons visit and interact with humanoid robots that fulfill different roles in their Wild West fantasies. This show contains sensitive material, such as violence, sexual violence, and racist/sexist language. We will supplement our viewing with a variety of shorter texts as well. Our assignments will include a longer, multi-layered researched inquiry essay and several shorter writing prompts.

TEXTS: Required: Westworld (Television series, Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy, 2016) available for streaming on HBO or Amazon Video.

 

ENG 202 - Writing About Literature

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. GUR: BCOM

A writing course designed to help students develop the skills of close reading and careful analysis of literary texts, with particular attention to how language, style, and form contribute to a text's social or political claims. Introduces students to the challenge of situating themselves in relation to a literary text and the critical conversation about that text, and crafting multi-draft critical essays with a focused, arguable thesis supported by thoughtful sequence of claims and carefully selected textual evidence.

20172 MWF 8:30-9:50 LAURA LAFFRADO

US Literatures between the Civil War and WWI

CONTENT: This course focuses on works written by American authors in the decades after the US Civil War (finally) ended but before the beginning of WWI. We will draw on a wide range of genres to consider how works written between two major wars may challenge our definition(s) of what "American" means and what "literature" means. We will examine roles of female and male discourse, race, region, and class. We will explore the various ways in which America and American identities are defined and attempt to arrive at a deeper understanding of the influences that shaped US writings during this period.

ASSIGNMENTS: Much reading and thinking will be asked of you, along with writing, editing, revision, steady attendance, participation, group work, and essays.

EVALUATION: Final grades will be based on the essays, class participation, and attendance.

TEXTS: Lauter, Paul (ed.), The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume C
Laffrado, Laura (ed.), Selected Writings of Ella Higginson: Inventing Pacific Northwest Literature

20344 MWF 10:00-11:20 SHANNON KELLY

Young Adult Literature: This composition course focuses on writing academic and creative responses to young-adult literature. In particular, we’ll read young-adult literature with multiple narrators who present varied perspectives within the same story. In our focus on perspective, we’ll consider questions such as: How do multiple narrators disrupt and affect our experience of linear narrative? What does it mean to hear the same story from multiple speakers? How do we analyze and respond to multiple perspectives?

Similar to texts, perspectives are situated and culturally bound to a time and place, while also determining the way we see and interact with the world around us. With this in mind, we’ll read with attention to the ways in which narrators in works meant for young adult audiences use language, form, and style to tell multi-voiced stories. We’ll also read theoretical texts that offer frameworks for analyzing our own responses to texts, and how perspectives determine and affect response. You’ll then write multi-draft writing projects that take up your own interests in response to questions of perspective, form, and style in analyzing young adult literature.

21002 MWF 1:00-2:20 SHANNON KELLY

Young Adult Literature: This composition course focuses on writing academic and creative responses to young-adult literature. In particular, we’ll read young-adult literature with multiple narrators who present varied perspectives within the same story. In our focus on perspective, we’ll consider questions such as: How do multiple narrators disrupt and affect our experience of linear narrative? What does it mean to hear the same story from multiple speakers? How do we analyze and respond to multiple perspectives?

 

Similar to texts, perspectives are situated and culturally bound to a time and place, while also determining the way we see and interact with the world around us. With this in mind, we’ll read with attention to the ways in which narrators in works meant for young adult audiences use language, form, and style to tell multi-voiced stories. We’ll also read theoretical texts that offer frameworks for analyzing our own responses to texts, and how perspectives determine and affect response. You’ll then write multi-draft writing projects that take up your own interests in response to questions of perspective, form, and style in analyzing young adult literature.

 

21009 MWF 2:30-3:50 CAROL GUESS

Poetry and Passing: What does it mean to look like who you are? What happens if you don't; that is, if you pass as someone else? In this course, we'll read and analyze contemporary poetry written by American writers whose work focuses on the theme of passing. We'll narrow this vast topic by analyzing writings on race (Shane McCrae's Mule), sexuality (Richard Siken's Crush), mental illness (Allison Benis White's Self-Portrait with Crayon), citizenship (Lee Ann Roripaugh's Dandarians), and marriage (Linda Malnack's 21 Boxes). Students will draft, write, and revise two critical papers, analyzing literary texts to develop a persuasive thesis on our theme.

21010 TR 10:00-11:50 TONY PRICHARD

Seeing Things: This course looks to that place where literature and madness overlap--texts that either address characters hallucinating or texts that claim to produce madness. We will inquire into the differences between madness, weirdness and that which is yet to be articulated and made habitual. We will examine at a variety of novels, short stories and films.

TEXTS

  • Chambers, Robert. The King in Yellow (online)
  • Shadows of Carcosa: Tales of Cosmic Horror by Lovecraft, Chambers, Machen, Poe, and Other Masters of the Weird
  • Strugastsky, Arkaday & Boris. The Dead Mountaineer’s Hotel
  • Wyndham, John. Chocky

21598 TR 12:00-1:50 MICHAEL BELL

This section of English 202 involves critical inquiry into the literary “effect”: the power of narrative to construct and inform our worldly experience, even our reality. To sometimes great extent, we model our identities on stories, and form our expectations, assumptions, and judgments from them. By making connection to our experiences and histories, stories illuminate the world, permitting us to see more texture and variety and possibility in our lives. The stories we read in this course range across genre, but largely concern questions of deliverance, redemption, and transformation, questions all of us must apply to our lives at some point. Through intensive reading, discussion, activity, and writing we will further develop our ability to make meaning from literary texts, focusing our analyses through formal critical practices as well as rigorous play and experimentation. You will emerge from the course a stronger analytic writer and reader with greater appreciation of the power of literature to bring you to deeper self-knowledge and increased awareness of a wider, richer, more complex world.

REQUIRED TEXTS: The Girl With All the Gifts, M.R. Carey; The Underground Railroad, Colson Whitehead; The Year of the Flood, Margaret Atwood; Venus in Furs, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch; The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin

ASSIGNMENTS: In addition to reading assignments and participation in class activities, requirements will comprise one formal analytical paper (including multiple drafts), a variety informal writing assignments, participation in online forums, and a final project.

 

ENG 214 - Shakespeare

GUR: HUM

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a selected number of Shakespeare's plays: histories, comedies, tragedies and romances.

20550 TR 10:00-11:50 NICHOLAS MARGARITIS

A detailed study of four of Shakespeare's finest plays, covering the major part of his career and the various genres he treated (history/chronicle play, tragedy, comedy/romance). Necessary attention to historical context of course, but primary focus will be on the inspired art of the individual works themselves. Works: Henry IV, Part 1; Hamlet; The Winter's Tale; The Tempest. Three in-class essay exams.

 

ENG 216 - American Literature

GUR: HUM

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of a range of texts in American literature with attention to cultural contexts.

23047 MWF 11:30-12:50 TONY PRICHARD

“America is not a young land: it is old and dirty and evil…The evil is there waiting.”—William S. Burroughs

Haunted America: Using William S. Burroughs quote as a point of departure we will examine the relationship between American Literature and the supernatural. We will look at how both America and American Literature is haunted.

Texts:

  • Joshi, S. T. ed. American Supernatural Tales
  • Whitehead, Colson. Zone One

 

ENG 234 - African-American Literature

GUR: BCGM

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of written, spoken and visual texts by African-American men and women from the 18th century to the present.

23221 MWF 8:30-9:50 TONY PRICHARD

This course will examine African American cultural production throughout the history of the United States. There will be an examination into the tropes used by authors and how there is a contrast with those of the predominant American Culture.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of African American Literature (Third Edition)

 

ENG 236 - Asian-American Literatures

GUR: BCGM

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of written and visual texts in English and translation by and about Asian-Americans.

23048 MWF 11:30-12:50 NING YU

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Some of the most significant and powerful writings in contemporary American literature are produced by Asian Americans, people who, or whose parents or grand parents, came from China, Japan, Korea, India, the Philippines and other Asian countries.  This course will focus on two major events in Asian American history, the construction of the transcontinental railroad and the internment camps during W.W.II.  Using both written and visual texts, students learn to see and criticize how ideology permeates texts, how contesting voices in the texts either reinforce or challenge the established oppressive social structure, and how cultural ignorance and misunderstanding may worsen ideological conflicts.  Stereotypical presentations of Asian Americans as "Other" in popular culture are juxtaposed with the self-portrayals by serious Asian American writers who search for individual as well as group identities.  We will start with Gary Okihiro's excellent theory on "margins and mainstreams," and then we will study five written and four visual texts closely, looking for patterns of presentation.  Eventually, students may want to change the cliche of "the big melting pot" into a less violent metaphor, a huge salad bowl, for example, and they will learn to appreciate the truly diverse nature, especially the bitter sweetness of an Asian American flavor.  6 quizzes, 3 discussion questions written and submitted on three different texts, with two full pages of written response to each question.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  1. Careful reading.  Read thoroughly and thoughtfully all assignments for each class meeting as scheduled, attend class regularly, recommend discussion topics and participate actively in class discussion and exercises.  13% of grade. I will run this large class as a discussion forum, and therefore student participation is of vital importance.  If a student has more than three unexcused absences from class, his/her final grade will not be higher than C no matter how well he or she does in other areas of the class.  Your thoughtful response to questions written by your peers are especially important in this area.
  2. Take a series of 6 quizzes on the reading assignments. 7% for each quiz, 42% of total  grade for all the quizzes.  The quizzes are mostly factual to make sure that you’ve read the texts carefully..
  3.  At three different times in the quarter, you are required to write a thought-provoking question on a particular reading assignment.  When it is your turn, you will post your question on the blackboard by eight the night before the class meets.  In class, for about ten minutes, you’ll lead the discussion of your questions.  These questions must be insightful and thought-provoking so as to generate lively discussions.  To do this well, you are required to write two full pages of response to your own question. You should  NOT post the written response on the blackboard but will submit it to the instructor after class.  As the process will be repeated by each student three times, you will be submitting 3 two-page responses through the whole quarter.  Your question should be open-ended, inviting your peers to ask further questions and in your attempt to answer those questions you lead the discussion into a higher, more sophisticated level.  You are expected to be the authoritative expert when you’re leading, so it’s a good idea to do some outside research. 10 % of grade for each question/response; a total of 30%.
  4. We will view 6 films during the quarter, for the first five of which, you are required to identify two concepts (for example, margin/main-stream, orientalism/hegemony, men/women, civilization/ wilderness, reason/emotion, superior/inferior, us/them, yellow/white, nature/construct, identity/role, presence/absence) that are particularly relevant to the understanding of a part of the plot, of a character, or of motifs in the film.  Be prepared to explain the relevance in class to your peers and instructor. Write it down and submit it to the instructor at the end of our planned discussion of the film.  If you somehow missed a class meeting, you must view the film on your own and submit your note in the instructor’s office to make sure that that part of grade is entered into the computer. 3% each; totally 15%.  The written notes will be checked, but not graded.

 

ENG 238 - Society Through Its Literature

GUR: HUM

A thematic approach to literature, with different themes exploring the relationship between literary forms and society. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics. May be taken only once for GUR credit.

22411 MWF 10:00-11:50 KRISTIANA KAHAKAUWILA

Pacific Literature

“That the sea is as real as you and I, that it shapes the character of this planet, that it is a major source of our sustenance, that it is something we all share in common wherever we are in Oceania-- all are statements of fact. But above that level of everyday experience, the sea is our pathway to each other and to everyone else, the sea is our endless saga, the sea is our most powerful metaphor, the ocean is in us.”
--From “We Are the Ocean” by Epeli Hau`ofa

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course asks you to leave behind the familiarity of continental land and step into Oceania, or the Pacific Ocean, the largest region in the world. Island hopping from Hawai`i to Aotearoa (New Zealand) from the Marshall Islands to Samoa, we will navigate the region through songs and chants, poetry and novels, films and visual art, and will read foundational texts as well as contemporary ones from well-known Pacific and Euro-American writers. The primary goal of this course is to introduce Pacific Literature from the perspective of the Pacific. To that end, the metaphor of the ocean is what holds these texts together. All majors are welcome and have something to contribute to the journey.

This course is also a great primer for learning or enhancing your skills in textual analysis, essay writing, creative writing, and thinking as a global citizen.

 

ENG 300 - Directed Independent Study

Credits: 1-15

An individualized course of study not available through or replacing existing curriculum, to be arranged between one matriculating student and sponsoring faculty member. All academic policies and registration deadlines apply. Directed Independent Study courses cannot substitute for General University Requirements and are not eligible for tuition waiver.

 

ENG 301 - Introduction to Writing Studies

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101; junior status.

Inquiry and practice of writing in personal, public and academic contexts. Emphasis on expressive, analytical, critical, and collaborative forms of writing as appropriate. Repeatable with different topics up to 10 credits including original course.

20091 MWF 11:30-12:50 DONNA QUALLEY

Open Letters Live!

"Dear Prospective English 301 Colleagues (or “To Whom It May Concern”):

 I am writing to provide you with information about the writing studies course I am offering spring quarter 2018. “Open Letters Live” is a studio writing course in non-fiction prose style that uses the genre of the open letter as a primary vehicle. The aim of this studio is to expand your rhetorical awareness and increase your stylistic flexibility. We’ll focus on those elements of writing that normally escape our attention: the individual words, the shape and placement of our sentences, the different ways we can string these words and sentences together, and the effects all these choices can have for our reading public.

To help us keep our readers in the forefront of our minds, we’ll be working with a genre that has a dual audience. Open letters are always addressed to a specific person, group, entity or even “thing,” but they are intended for circulation to wider audience. As you will discover, individuals, groups, organizations, and companies write open letters to serve a number of purposes: To share, to inform to explain, to critique, to incite, to emotionally affect. Some letters can get quite lengthy, but we will limit ourselves to shorter missives (of approximately 400-600 words).

As a genre, open letters have been around for centuries. However, the number of people writing open letters has catapulted since the advent of the internet, blogging and self-publishing. Interestingly, entire websites now devote themselves to collecting and publishing open letters. In order to understand the reasons people turn to the genre of the letter, we’ll also consider letters that were originally written to a private audience but have since moved into the public domain.

Since we will meet in a computer lab, a good part of our class time will be spent in studio or “production” mode where you will have the opportunity to try on, emulate, and experiment with an ever-accumulating repertoire of rhetorical moves gained from our reading, I’ll be moving around the studio, peering over your shoulder or sitting next to you, sometimes making an observation or offering a suggestion. What happens when you write it this way?  Or that way? What difference does it make?  For whom might it make a difference? How can small changes sometimes create big rhetorical effects?  At the end of the course we will celebrate your good work with a “Letters Live!” performance and a digital Style Gallery of selected letters and accompanying analyses.

Looking forward to meeting you!

Donna

*P.S.  Just curious, how did you pronounce the word “live” in the title? With a long “i” or short “i”?   What difference does your pronunciation make to your understanding of this phrase (By the way, both pronunciations are correct in terms of what this class is about). Of course, had I opted to rewrite the phrase as “Live Open Letters,” my guess is that there would have been no confusion in pronunciation or meaning. Words and the ways we string them together make a difference."

 

ENG 302 - Introduction to Technical and Professional Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101; junior standing.

Introduction to major contemporary strategies and conventions used in written and oral communication for multiple audiences in professional settings. Covers a variety of written forms used in the preparation and design of technical and business documents, critical analyses of these forms and practices, and the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

20195 TR 8:00-9:50 RACHEL SARKAR

Introduction to major contemporary strategies and conventions used in written and oral communication for multiple audiences in professional settings. Covers a variety of written forms used in the preparation and design of technical and business documents, critical analyses of these forms and practices, and the ethical and social implications of a technical writer's choices.

20466 TR 8:00-9:50 ANDREW LUCCHESI

Topic: Educational Reality

All sections of English 302 are designed to examine the way writing allows work to get done in the world--whether it’s funding a nonprofit with a grant or snagging a job with a cover letter. This section of English 302 focuses on the question of how technical writing works within the context of education. We examine how teachers use technical writing to connect the dots between our theories of education on the one side (how do people learn? how do people teach?), and, on the other side, our real-world lives as students and teachers (what do you need to know to get by? what do I have the resources to teach you?). Technical writing provides teachers, educational designers, and pedagogical theorists alike with a tool to bridge that gap between educational theory and educational reality. I mean technical genres like lesson plans, screen-capture videos, syllabi, course websites, web lectures, message boards, grading rubrics, video games, surveys, quizzes, and activity handouts--to name a few. To put it not-too overdramatically, the whole enterprise of education rests on how well these texts are designed, revised, and shared.

This is an open-structure class, meaning that for the most part your writing assignments will be voluntary and self-paced (with a few constraints). You will choose from a menu of assignments, each exploring one of the main themes of the class: (a) describing and defining teaching/learning; (b) teaching as a text-based performance; (c) learning through technology; and (d) conducting pedagogical research. Your final project will involve creating a portfolio of your revised pieces from the course and composing a lengthy self-analysis (3,000 wds) about your work and its relation to the course concepts.

There will be no required books for this class. Instead, we will read a wide range of shorter pieces by pedagogical theorists, teacher-scholars, and educational technologists. This class is designed to focus on teaching in the humanities and liberal arts (K-12 and college levels), but I’d welcome students from other disciplines interested in the topic.

If you are interested in taking this course or if you would like to talk discuss individual accommodations for the class, please email andrew.lucchesi@wwu.edu.

20555 TR 10:00-11:50 MICHAEL BELL

In this section of English 302 you’ll develop your skill in generating reader-centered documents that work: documents that do things as well as say things, performing specific functions for specific kinds of readers. Given that so much of our culture now communicates and conducts its business in the visual realm, your work in the course will be focused as much on document design as written language. Through this work you will gain an understanding of how all the elements of a document work together to communicate within specific contexts, for specific audiences.

English 302 is not simply a skills-acquisition course however. It’s also a course about ideas. We will use technical communication as a field in which to conduct analytic inquiry appropriate to study in the humanities. The course is organized around a sequence of projects. Each of them focus on an aspect of professional communication, but all of them will work within a guiding framework. This spring the analytic component of the course will take us into a study of games and the culture surrounding them: from board games, to collectible card games, to table-top role-playing games, to social-media games, to video games. As a student of the course, you will be teaming with other students on a series of documents, presentations, and prototypes leading to the development of an original tabletop game. The design of your game will be based in part on contemporary game studies and critiques. Every stage of this inquiry will generate documents in accord with the guidelines of effective technical and professional communication. (And yes, we will be playing games in class!)

You will emerge from the course with the ability to respond effectively to the requirements of technical communication.  You will also have a complex understanding of what is becoming a vital aspect of our contemporary culture.

20595 TR 10:00-11:00 GERI FORSBERG

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of non-academic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives for their written documents, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, instructions, and a magazine article.  Students also learn to work in small groups, collaborate on writing, and make effective oral presentations. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work.  When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

20640 TR 12:00-1:50 GERI FORSBERG

English 302 is the English department’s introductory 300-level course in technical writing. It is for juniors and seniors. It is a 5-credit writing proficiency course. English 302 emphasizes the writer-reader relationship in a variety of non-academic writing situations. Students learn to identify their audience, develop objectives for their written documents, organize the content of their documents and revise documents for readability. Students write and design a resume, letters, memos, a proposal, instructions, and a magazine article.  Students also learn to work in small groups, collaborate on writing, and make effective oral presentations. The final project in this course is a professional portfolio which provides examples of your strongest work.  When you have completed this course, you should be ready to write in the professional world.

20796 TR 12:00-1:50 SIMON MCGUIRE

This writing intensive course invites you to explore what is technical about technical writing. Course projects ask you to analyze and create technical documents that relate to your academic, professional and social interests. Projects emphasize rhetorical analysis, document design, user testing, and the practical and cultural implications of your choices as a writer. Throughout the course, you’ll learn to re-imagine the page, to edit and revise documents for visual impact, and to view your readers as information users with specific needs. We will also examine and utilize fundamental concepts in technical writing such as readability/usability, page layout and visual rhetoric, and the importance of analyzing your audience before you write.

 

ENG 308 - Seminar in Literature & Culture: Early Modern

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 308 if you have already taken ENG 318 or 308.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the Early Modern period. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 308 and ENG 318 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

22035 TR 12:00-1:50 MARY J. METZGER

Shakespeare and Philosophy: In this course, we will read a range of Shakespeare’s tragedies in light of philosophical questions they raise and attempt to answer, with a particular emphasis on human knowledge (epistemology) and right action (ethics). The course assumes no philosophical background but we will spend time establishing a working vocabulary and basic historical understanding of philosophical and literary forms and focus on a few major ethical theories. Throughout the course, we will explore the connection between philosophical inquiry, human complexity, and literary and, more specifically, tragic poetic & dramatic form and meaning. We will use occasional excerpts from philosophers to develop our understanding as we read and discuss Shakespeare’s work. Much writing, close reading, and critical thinking is required.
 
TEXT: The Norton Shakespeare: Tragedies (No substitute)

 

ENG 309 - Seminar in Literature & Culture: The Long 18th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 309 if you have already taken ENG 319 or 309.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the long eighteenth century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 309 and ENG 319 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

22036 MWF 8:30-9:50 JULIE DUGGER

Revolt and Reform: This course examines the mutually constitutive relationship between politics, literature, and social reform in the British eighteenth and early nineteenth century. We will read and evaluate works associated with social developments including the 1845 Jacobite rebellion, the American and French revolutions, the early abolitionist movement, and the development of bardic nationalism. Questions we will ask include the following:

•    How do literary works frame and foster political identity and social movements?
•    How do social and political contexts influence literary form, as well as our understanding of which written works count as literature?
•    It’s said that history is written by the victors. To what extent is this also true of literary genres including the ballad or the novel? What is the role of popular literature in popular protest, and to what extent can literature succeed in providing a voice for those who may lack one?

Requirements for this seminar version of the course include two short papers, one of which will be revised and developed into a longer final paper.

 

ENG 310 - Seminar in Literature & Culture: The Long 19th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the long nineteenth century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 310 and ENG 320 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

22037 MWF 10:00-11:20 NING YU

Description: This course surveys works by writers of Chinese descent in North America from the 1890s to the present millennium . We will read, analyze and discuss texts by Sui Sin Far, Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Ruthanne Lum McCunn, Gish Jen, Shawn Wong, David Wong Louie and Jamie Ford in the context of both American and Chinese cultures, especially the history of Chinese immigration. Our objective is to achieve a better understanding of the rich diversity within Chinese American communities. One oral presentation, one final paper of 12-15 pages, five written questions and responses.

Texts: Frank Chin, The Chickencoop Chinaman, The Year of the Dragon: Two Plays by Frank Chin; Maxine Hong Kingston, China Men; Ruthanne Lum McCunn, Thousand Pieces of Gold; Gish Jen, Typical American, David Wong Louie, The Barbarians Are Coming, Shawn Wong, American Knees: A Novel, Jamie Ford, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.

Requirements:

  1. Heavy (but fun) reading. Students must read all the assigned texts carefully and be well prepared to discuss them in depth. Active participation in class discussion is a must for a successful student in this class.
  2. An oral presentation on a topic chosen by the student from a list provided by the instructor
  3. Each student is responsible for five thought-provoking written questions and responses about the assigned texts. Each question should have a page long response and the questions are due the night (by 7 pm) before discussion, so that the instructor will organize his lecture and discussion in response to them. Written responses are not to be posted on Canvas but submitted to the instructor after the discussion during which it was used.
  4. A final paper about 15 pages (double space) in length. Students are encouraged, though not required, to incorporate their presentation research into their final paper.
  5. Last but not least, regular attendance is required. The student will lose 3% of their total grade for each unexcused absence. No student with more than three unexcused absences will get a grade higher than C+ no matter how well s/he does in the class otherwise. Evaluation: Class participation = 25% of total grade; written questions = 25% (5% per question and response); oral presentation = 20%; final paper = 30%.

Schedule

  • Week 1 Introduction; “The righteous one that didn’t forget China”: Sui Sin Far
  • Week 2 “Are Asians black or white”? Frank Chin
  • Week 3 The railroad and its literary productivity: Maxine Hong Kingston
  • Week 4 Mythology and literature: Maxine Hong Kingston
  • Week 5 Nu Shu (Women’s Written Language that man can’t read); Ruthanne McCunn
  • Week 6 “Typical American”: Gish Jen
  • Week 7 Mixed races: Shawn Wong
  • Week 8 Doctor or chef? David Wong Louie
  • Week 9 Best sellers: Jamie Ford
  • Week 10 Best sellers: A brief introduction to Amy Tam’s “Mother Tongue”; Conferencing

 

ENG 311 - Seminar in Literature & Culture: The 20-21st Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

A research and writing intensive course in the context of the literary history of the 20-21st century. Students will develop the skills to research and write about literary texts and participate in the critical conversations about them. (Only one of ENG 311 and ENG 321 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

22038 TR 2:00-3:50 MARK LESTER

In this section of English 311, we will examine the work of three modernist writers –– Virginia Woolf, Gertrude Stein, and Mina Loy –– not primarily in terms of their standing as feminist writers, but as writers who, from their relatively marginalized positions, developed original and revolutionary modes of thought that continue to impact ourthinking. In Everybody’s Autobiography, for example, Stein’s remarks on the importance of seriality can be regarded as untimely in the sense that they resonate with contemporary art and writing in a manner that not only helps to expose how a good deal of contemporary art works, what it does, what effect it might have, but also insofar as it provides us with a means of looking back at earlier works of art and literature in a productive manner. In “What are Master-pieces and Why There Are So Few of Them” (1936), she is already working to undermine the Western privileging of speech (“talking has nothing to do with creation, talking is really human nature as it is and human nature has nothing to do with master-pieces”), as well as to destabilize the traditional conception of the author and authorial “expression.” She does this, moreover, with a great deal of humor. Woof and Stein are both engaged in the examination of temporality, and their work illuminates early twentieth century controversies regarding the nature of time and resonates with late twentieth and twenty-first century ideas about the relationship of time and subjectivity, on one hand, and notions of the Event on the other. The problem of contingency (potentiality, the virtual) figures prominently in the work of all three. Mina Loy  is perhaps the most overtly political of the three writers; her work demonstrates resistance to complacency and a rejection, as Peter Nichols remarked, of "any coherent model of the self as something both imaginary and conventional."

TEXTS:

  • Virginia Woolf, To the Light House, The Waves;
  • Gertrude Stein, Selections;
  • Mina Loy, Stories and Essay, The Lost Lunar Baedeker.
  • Other materials will be made available in class or on Canvas.

 

ENG 313 - Introduction to Critical and Cultural Theories and Practices

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

Introduction to a range of critical and cultural theories in a historical context. Emphasis on critical reading and writing in preparation for 400-level courses in literary and cultural studies.

20092 MWF 10:00-11:20 MARK LESTER

This course will focus on a series of questions concerning the nature, function, and value of literature: What exactly is a work of literature? (What is its ontological status?) How does it work? For whom does it have value? On what grounds should a work of literature be judged or assessed? Should it be conceived of strictly as an object of analysis (something to be interpreted and explained), or does the work of literature possess a distinct dynamic, critical, and constructive dimension of its own? To what kind of knowledge can authors and readers of literary works lay claim? Using Plato as our starting point, we will follow a number of different trajectories that will allow us to explore the intersections of literature ‘proper’ and philosophy, science, and literary analysis. In this section, emphasis will be given to twentieth and twenty-first century radical or oppositional political critical perspectives.

TEXTS:

  • The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism
  • Plato, Selected Dialogues
  • Bruno Jasienski, I Burn Paris
  • Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot
  • The Invisible Committee, Now
  • Other materials will be made available in class or on Canvas.

20517 TR 8:00-8:50 MARK LESTER

Foundations of Contemporary Theory and Criticism: Ecocriticism

This course will focus on a series of questions concerning the nature, function, and value of literature: What exactly is a work of literature? (What is its ontological status?) How does it work? For whom does it have value? On what grounds should a work of literature be judged or assessed? Should it be conceived of strictly as an object of analysis (something to be interpreted and explained), or does the work of literature possess a distinct dynamic, critical, and constructive dimension of its own? To what kind of knowledge can authors and readers of literary works lay claim? Using Plato as our starting point, we will follow a number of different trajectories that will allow us to explore the intersections of literature ‘proper’ and philosophy, science, and literary analysis. In this section, emphasis will be given to what in recent years has come to be called ecocriticism — the critical investigation of a variety of problems relating to both the experience and representation of nature.

TEXTS:

  • V. Leitch, et. al., Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism;
  • Plato, Selected Dialogues;
  • Giorgio Agamben, The Open: Man and Animal
  • Didier Debaise, Nature as Event: the Lure of the Possible
  • Amitav Ghosh, The Great Derangement: Climate change and the Unthinkable
  • Other material will be made available in class or on Canvas

20450 MWF 11:30-12:50 KATHLEEN LUNDEEN

In this course, we’ll examine literary evaluation from Plato to the present and see how the private activity of reading has always existed within a public domain. In our encounters with contemporary theorists we’ll explore the wide range of interpretive approaches to literary analysis.

ASSIGNMENTS: Several critical essays; a final exam; vibrant class participation.

TEXTS: Richter, The Critical Tradition (shorter edition); Abrams, Glossary of Literary Terms (11th edition); MLA Handbook (8th edition)

 

ENG 317 - Survey in Literature & Culture: Medieval

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the medieval period with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 307 and ENG 317 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

22039 TR 12:00-1:50 NICHOLAS MARGARITIS

Literature of the middle ages, from the 10th century to the end of the 14th, of various genres, including Old English devotional and heroic verse, Old French chansons de geste, French and Middle English romance, Italian and Middle English framed-tale narrative and dream-vision poetry. Works include: The Dream of the Rood; The Battle of Maldon; The Wanderer; The Song of Roland; Amis and Amile; Chretien de Troyes' Yvain; the anonymous Sir Orfeo and Sir Gawain & the Green Knight; selections from Boccaccio's Decameron and Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales and The Book of the Duchess; and the anonymous Pearl. Three essay exams.

 

ENG 318 - Survey in Literature & Culture: Early Modern

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the Early Modern period with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 308 and ENG 318 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

23049 TR 2:00-3:50 NICHOLAS MARGARITIS

A highly detailed, in-depth study of two major and massive works, the 16th century prose masterpiece Gargantua and Pantagruel by Rabelais and Milton’s 17th century poetic masterpiece Paradise Lost.  Necessary attention to historical context of course; but the main emphasis will be on the artistry of individual genius.  Assignments will include two exams, a short paper on literary analogues, and a larger research paper.

BOOKS: Rabelais, Gargantua and Pantagruel (tr. Urquhart. Everyman’s); Milton, Paradise Lost (Norton Critical Edition)

 

ENG 319 - Survey in Literature & Culture: The Long 18th Century

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202. The seminar and survey time periods are not repeatable. Do not take ENG 319 if you have already taken ENG 309 or 319.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the long eighteenth century with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 309 and ENG 319 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

22040 MWF 10:00-11:20 JULIE DUGGER

Revolt and Reform: This course examines the mutually constitutive relationship between politics, literature, and social reform in the British eighteenth and early nineteenth century. We will read and evaluate works associated with social developments including the 1845 Jacobite rebellion, the American and French revolutions, the early abolitionist movement, and the development of bardic nationalism. Questions we will ask include the following:

•    How do literary works frame and foster political identity and social movements?
•    How do social and political contexts influence literary form, as well as our understanding of which written works count as literature?
•    It’s said that history is written by the victors. To what extent is this also true of literary genres including the ballad or the novel? What is the role of popular literature in popular protest, and to what extent can literature succeed in providing a voice for those who may lack one?

Requirements for this survey version of the course include two short papers and an open book essay final exam.

 

ENG 321 - Survey in Literature & Culture: The 20-21st Centuries

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of texts in English or in translation from the 20-21st centuries with an attention to literary history. (Only one of ENG 311 and ENG 321 may be taken for credit in English majors and minors.)

22041 TR 2:00-3:50 BRIAN TWENTER

Indigenous Autobiographies are a contested and controversial genre within the larger field of Indigenous Literatures. Our primary work will be to trace the development of Indigenous historical and contemporary texts, including visual or pictorial autobiography, collaborative or “as told to” autobiographies, memoirs, and other contemporary personal narratives. We will discuss the critical issues particular to this genre or mode of writing, including the concept of authorship, modes of production, questions of authenticity, and the role of the editor and/or translator, in addition to those specific to Indigenous Literatures—relationship to Landscapes and community, identity issues, and preservation of language and culture.

Required Texts: Alexie, Sherman. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian; Deborah A. Miranda. Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir; Momaday, N. Scott. The Way to Rainy Mountain; Neihardt, John G. Black Elk Speaks; Red Shirt, Delphine. Bead on an Anthill: A Lakota Childhood; Silko, Leslie Marmon. Storyteller.

 

ENG 333 - Indigenous Lit of the Pacific

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202.

Studies in world literature in English or translation and of their historical and cultural contexts.

23069 TR 10:00-11:50 BRIAN TWENTER

Indigenous Literatures of the Pacific Northwest and Native Pacific: For the Indigenous Nations of the Native Pacific and the Pacific Northwest, water is sacred, water is a way of life, and water is life. In this course we will explore Indigenous Literatures from multiple genres that consider the familial kinship relationships between Waterscapes and a select few Nations from the multitude of Pacific and Pacific Northwest Indigenous Peoples. Some of the texts we will delve into include Potiki by Māori author Patricia Grace; Spokane-Coeur d’Alene short fiction by Gloria Bird and Sherman Alexie; a Lummi play, What About Those Promises? by Darrell Hillaire; Tulalip From My Heart, a memoir by Harriette Shelton Dover; Red: A Haida Manga, a graphic novel by Haida artitst Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas; and Heart Berries, a new work by Terese Marie Mailhot from the Stó:lō Nation.

 

ENG 334 - Literary and Creative Expression Across North America and Europe

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101 or equivalent. GUR: BCGM.

Analysis primarily of North American and European texts with engagement in issues of multiculturalism and cultural diversity. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics. May be taken only once for GUR credit.

21776 MWF 2:30-3:50 SIMON MCGUIRE

Pataphysics: this course surveys the initial effects of the willfully irrational “science of imaginary solutions” initiated by Alfred Jarry in Paris at the beginning of the 20th century and considers its evolution in modernist avant-gardes and stubborn influence on 21st century art, literature and philosophy.

23220 MWF 8:30-9:50 DAWN DIETRICH

Graphic Novels

Course Description: Comic books, though historically depicted as corrupters of youth, agents of illiteracy, signs of moral and intellectual degeneration, and evidence for the decline of western civilization, are gaining a hip, new reputation as an impressive and promising literary medium.  This course will study the evolution of English language comics from early turn-of-the-century newspaper comic strips and pulp entertainment to sequential art forms and graphic novels in the twenty-first century.  In particular, we will focus on the emergence of the graphic novel during the 1980s, which extended a tradition of abbreviated comic forms to include longer, more cohesive word/image art recognized for its narrative coherence, formal complexity, and alternative sensibility.  We will approach the study of graphic novels as a sequential art form and investigate its intermedial relationship to both print and electronic media, including web comics. We’ll consider the role comics have played in censorship campaigns and other forms of social regulation, including the Congressional debates, which concerned juvenile delinquency in the 1950s, and the Comics Code Authority, which still governs the content of mainstream comics today. Equally important, we’ll look at comics’ relationship to history and politics in a post WWII context, exploring a diverse range of cultural perspectives.      

Assignments and Evaluation: You will have the opportunity to write critically and creatively in a variety of genres with options built into the assignments.  The range of assignments includes a graphic novel blog with multiple entries, a multi-modal essay (5-7 pages), and a short comic or graphic novella. This project can be a comic strip, comic book, or web comic and can utilize hand drawn methods, collage, photography, or digital media.  In other words, I am very open to how you might imagine the project, and you may also collaborate with others.

*I will make sure all of the books are on library reserve, in case you don’t want to buy all of them.

  • Understanding Comics, Scott McCloud
  • March, vols. 1-3, John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell
  • Maus I and II, Art Spiegelman
  • Black Hole, Charles Burns
  • Fun Home:  A Family Tragicomic, Alison Bechdel
  • City of Glass:  The Graphic Novel, Paul Auster, Paul Kurasik, and David Mazzucchelli
  • Watchmen, Alan Moore

Films

  • Watchmen, Zack Snyder
  • The Mindscape of Alan Moore, DeZ Vylenz

 

ENG 336 - Scriptural Literatures

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. GUR: ACGM

Analysis of literary texts in one or more religious traditions, which originated in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America; study of scriptural literature as a source of cultural paradigms.

23050 TR 12:00-1:50 CHRISTOPHER WISE

Ancient World: This course will explore handwritten (or “chirographic”) manuscripts from the ancient world, including Egyptian, Greek, and Middle Eastern writings.  We will explore the Homeric epic and other forms of pre-Platonic forms of literacy, including key differences between orality and literacy and the impact of alphabetic literacy upon the ancient world.  We will also explore differences in orientations to literacy within the Abrahamic traditions, i.e. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam."

In addition to group work, students will turn-in three formal writing assignments: a take-home midterm essay exam, an in-class final.

Texts: Homer, The Illiad; Raymond Faulkner (ed.), The Egyptian Book of the Dead; F. R. Peters, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

 

ENG 338 - Women and Literature in North America and Europe

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101. GUR: BCGM

Study of women's texts in various cultures primarily of North America and Europe, including thematic and stylistic development within cultural context.

20571 TR 2:00-3:50 JEANNE YEASTING

CONTENT: This literature course will focus on a range of 19th-21st century women authors. We’ll examine some of the complex issues underlying their texts, such as colonialism, gender constraints, class inequality, and wartime occupation. We’ll consider some of the ways these works explore, challenge, resist, or otherwise “talk back” to their cultures. Students can expect to work with a range of texts including novels, poetry, creative nonfiction, feminist theory, and film, in order to come to a better understanding of the cultural, political, and social histories of exchange that develop through the movement of ideas and inspiration across time.

ASSIGNMENTS & EVALUATION: Requirements include quizzes, collaborative group projects, exams, reading responses, lots of reading, and lots of thinking.

TEXTS:

  • Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
  • Anne Carson, Glass, Irony, and God
  • Kristin Hannah, The Nightingale
  • Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own
  • Selected texts on Canvas

Note: You are expected to buy the editions that have been selected for this course; class assignments are based on the page numbers in these specific texts.

 

ENG 347 - Studies in Young Adult Literature

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 or permission of instructor.

Studies in literature written for and/or by young adults. May focus on literary history, genres, theme, critical approaches or specific authors. Class assignments and discussion may focus on using this literature with young adults in secondary schools and in a home setting.

20540 MWF 11:30-12:50 PAM HARDMAN

In this course we’ll read a diverse array of texts written for young adults. These books all address complex notions about identity, power, race, sexuality, gender, class, love, and voice. We’ll explore the texts from a variety of angles, asking questions of the texts themselves and readers’ responses to the texts. In addition to exploring the books, we’ll think about the histories of childhood and adolescence, and how youth culture is represented. We’ll address issues of consumerism, popular culture, and technology, looking at their effects on this genre of literature and its target audience. You should expect much intensive reading and lively discussion.

Required Texts:  Sherman Alexie, Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Isabel Quintero, Gabi, a Girl in Pieces; Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Dante and Aristotole Discover the Secrets of the Universe; Neal Shusterman, Challenger Deep; Mariko and Jillian Tamaki, Skim; Angie Thomas, The Hate You Give; one choice book

Assignments: Question-response sets; group book presentation; final project; final exam

 

ENG 350 - Introduction to Creative Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Examines the fundamentals of at least two genres, such as fiction, nonfiction, playwriting, or poetry. The course will include both lectures, focused on model texts, and workshop-style discussions, focused on student work.

20196 MWF 2:30-3:50 CHRISTOPHER PATTON

First premise. There is no one who is not creative. To make art—to sing, dance, shape sound, movement, language, or paint, any medium—is a birthright, as natural to us as our powers of speech and affection are. Second premise. We have not always been well served by our schooling. School may have, in fostering some of our capacities, estranged us from others. Most of us were probably better poets at six than at sixteen. Tentative conclusion. It is one task of a creative writing course—especially an introductory course—to rekindle the spark that connects, not A to B, but Q to oranges, mosses to stars. I never know exactly what this course will be—it is always a work in progress and collaborative—but I trust you’ll feel more awake to being alive here now for having taken it. Count on a lot of creative exercises, some of them loopy and some rigorous, as well as close reading of published work and thoughtful responses to your writing and that of your peers. Grades will be based on assigned exercises, a writing journal, a final portfolio, and active and generous participation.

20660 TR 10:00-11:50 JEANNE YEASTING

This introductory course will focus on creating original creative nonfiction and poetry.  Students will examine the craft of numerous authors, and use their writing as catalysts for generating and revising their own work.  Class will be a mixture of discussion of assigned writing models, writing exercises (including faithful forgeries), and workshopping writing-in-progress.

ASSIGNMENTS: Assignments will include writing and revising original creative nonfiction and poems; completing craft analyses; and writing reading responses. Required texts will serve as models for many writing assignments. Students may be required to work on a collaborative project and/or attend outside literary events.

EVALUATION: Based largely on class participation, completion of assigned writings, and a Final Portfolio Project.

TEXTS:

  • In Short, edited by Judith Kitchen and Mary Paumier Jones
  • 250 Poems: A Portable Anthology, 3rd edition, edited by Peter Schabel and Jack Ridl
  • The Poet’s Companion, edited by Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux
  • Various poems and other texts on Canvas

 

ENG 351 - Introduction to Fiction Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Examines the fundamental tools available to writers of fiction: point of view, dialog, characterization and voice. The course introduces the terms and protocol of workshop critique.

20422 MWF 2:30-3:50 ELIZABETH COLEN

A dozen takes on the short story form. In this introductory fiction course, students will analyze all aspects of the short story form, including plot, point of view, characterization, setting, and conflict, as well as the sonic qualities of language; learn how these tools are combined to best effect in the service of storytelling; develop a language for discussing the interplay of a writer’s craft and content; and engage with weekly writing exercises. The final project will be a portfolio that includes 8-12 pages of one fully revised, well-crafted story.

206611 TR 10:00-11:50 KAMI WESTHOFF

This course is designed to introduce you to the craft and culture of writing fiction as well as the complex world of critique and workshop. We will read established authors from various backgrounds and cultures and study the ways in which they make their writing work through unique use of voice, description, language, dialogue, character development, and experimentation. While reading and studying these authors, you will begin your own journey into fiction writing with the help of various writing exercises and assignments, revision, and most importantly, your imagination and individuality.

 

ENG 353 - Introduction to Poetry Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Introduction to the techniques of poetry writing, including craft, practice and modeling.

20093 TR 2:00-3:50 BRUCE BEASLEY

This course will be an intensive introduction to poetry and all aspects of poetry writing, including metaphor; rhythm; imagery; sonic devices such as assonance, consonance, alliteration, and rhyme; formal structures (villanelle, sestina, pantoum, sonnet, couplets, quatrains); and revision. We will read a few poems intensively each class and do a variety of in-class writings and exercises in response to the model poems. Students will develop three portfolios of finished poems derived from exercises and in-class writings, a portfolio of revisions, and will perform a poem of their choice.

 

ENG 354 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Writing

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

An introductory course in writing nonfiction prose, such as personal essay, memoir, autobiography, travel writing, and other forms.

20451 MWF 10:00-11:20 KAITLYN TEER

An introductory course in writing nonfiction prose, such as personal essay, memoir, autobiography, travel writing, and other forms.

20787 MWF 2:30-3:50 NANCY PAGH

Students in this section of English 354 will explore a range of forms and themes in the literary genre of creative nonfiction.  Through theorizing the ethics of "truth" telling, close reading and critical analysis of example texts, exploration of the potential of journaling or notebooking, and immersion in the process of exploratory writing, drafting, revising, and polishing personal essays, participants will come to better understand and express their language, themselves, and their world.

Class meetings will focus on discussion of assigned texts; engaging with writing prompts and exploratory exercises; workshopping drafts; and editing and polishing exercises.  Grading is based on preparation, participation, and attendance; satisfactory completion of exploratory work; and assessment of mid-term and end-of-term portfolios of revised and polished creative writing with accompanying reflection on learning.

TEXTS:
•    Brenda Miller and Suzanne Paola, Tell It Slant: Creating, Refining, and Publishing Creative Nonfiction.  2nd edition.  McGraw Hill, 2012.  978-0071781770
•    The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction.  Simon & Schuster, 2007.  978-1416531746
•    Also recommended:  Lynda Barry, What It Is.  Drawn & Quarterly, 2008. 978-1897299357

 

ENG 364 - Introduction to Film Studies

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101

Overview of the conventions and techniques of narrative cinema with some readings in film theory.

20662 MWF 10:00-11:20 & FILM SCREENINGS R 4:00-6:50 GREG YOUMANS

The course introduces the foundations of film studies. We will explore core vocabulary, concepts, and skills that will help us look and listen more closely to motion pictures. We will also develop practices of critical thinking, argumentation, and analysis through various writing exercises: a movie review, a screening report, and a sequence analysis. Our course screenings will include films from around the world and from the historical beginnings of cinema to the present day. A video production assignment will further enrich everyone’s understanding of how movies are put together.

TEXTS:

Required text:

  • David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson, Film Art: An Introduction—either the 10th or 11th edition is fine

Recommended texts:

  • Timothy Corrigan, A Short Guide to Writing About Film—either the 7th, 8th, or 9th edition are fine
  • Edward Ross, Filmish: A Graphic Journey through Film

 

ENG 365 - Topics in Film History

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 364 or ENG 202

Analysis, interpretation and discussion of films belonging to a particular period in film history. Repeatable with different topics up to ten credits including original course.

22050 MWF 11:30-12:50 & FILM SCREENINGS M 4:00-6:50 DAWN DIETRICH

Course Description: This course explores a range of post-millennial films (2010 and after), characterized by a response to technology’s ability to shape and redefine human subjectivity and identity.  Harkening back to early cinema’s fascination with cinematic form, these recent films are distinct, in terms of the ways they utilize film technique and industry conventions to create a highly mediated cinematic experience, moving beyond conventional narrative construction to create an interface between the film text and our daily interactions with intelligent machines.   The selected films, from varying levels of commercial cinema, utilize the filmic medium to create affective responses in a variety of contexts—with the goal of breaking down preconceived notions about how human subjectivity and identity are shifting in our current age of ubiquitous computing.  

Specifically, the movies experiment with film form and conventions to develop material metaphors that demonstrate a form of visual argumentation, mediated relationships between human and non-human actors, and the extension of the human sensorium into virtual strata.  Moving beyond the optical sensation of film, many of these movies highlight the affective experience of watching film, including the haptic responses that come from an embodied perspective.  We will look at reception spaces in an expanded sense—from physical spaces dependent upon projectors and screens to “virtual spaces” that come from fluid immersion in TV, laptop, or handheld devices.  Highly attuned to the embodied experience of viewers, these films privilege the body, senses, perceptive modalities, tactile, affective, and sensory motor perceptions in deeply creative ways.  Thus, the course will focus on new films in the context of affective and new materialist theories.

Course Expectations: Students will engage in media-specific analysis of film and digital video within the post-millennial context, preparing three analytical essays and a group presentation for evaluation.  We will be reading contemporary film theory that attempts to situate our current cultural moment in the larger stream of cinema history; and students will be working with the films closely to provide readings of their content and form.

Selected Films From Among the Following:

  • Her, Spike Jonze (2013)
  • Locke, Stephen Knight (2013)
  • Get Out, Jordan Peele (2017)
  • Tim’s Vermeer, Raymond Teller (2013)
  • Under the Skin, Jonathan Glazer (2013)
  • It Follows, David Mitchell (2015)
  • 13th, Ava DuVernay (2016)
  • Ex Machina, Alex Garland (2015)
  • Only Lovers Left Alive, Jim Jarmusch (2013)
  • Nightcrawler, Dan Gilroy (2014)
  • Mad Max: Fury Road, George Miller (2015)
  • Enemy, Denis Villeneuve (2013)

Required Texts

  • Film Theory: An Introduction Through the Senses, Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener
  • Carnal Thoughts:  Embodiment and Moving Image Culture, Vivian Sobchack
  • Touch: Sensuous Theory and Multi-Sensory Media, Laura Marks

 

ENG 370 - Introduction to Language

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101.

Overview of language structure and use. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, how language is acquired, and how it changes over space and time. Emphasis on English as a global language.

20094 TR 10:00-11:50 CATHY MCDONALD

This course is an introduction to the wonder and nature of language. Course content includes a survey of approaches used to probe, wonder about, and understand language, including the branches of linguistics called phonology, morphology, syntax, and stylistics. Questions about gender and language, cultural prejudices about accents and dialects, and speculative ideas about the role of language in shaping thinking and identity—all of these are topics in English 370. We’ll see that while many aspects of language are rule-governed phenomena that can be studied with mathematical precision, others are as loose and ephemeral as our sense of ourselves and our understanding of experience. No wonder, then, that philosophers and computer-scientists, mathematicians and poets, all find a common subject in language.

Course work will include regular homework exercises, project/tests, and outside readings. Lively participation is required as part of the course.

TEXT: An Introduction to Language 11th ed

21150 TR 2:00-3:50 CATHY MCDONALD

This course is an introduction to the wonder and nature of language. Course content includes a survey of approaches used to probe, wonder about, and understand language, including the branches of linguistics called phonology, morphology, syntax, and stylistics. Questions about gender and language, cultural prejudices about accents and dialects, and speculative ideas about the role of language in shaping thinking and identity—all of these are topics in English 370. We’ll see that while many aspects of language are rule-governed phenomena that can be studied with mathematical precision, others are as loose and ephemeral as our sense of ourselves and our understanding of experience. No wonder, then, that philosophers and computer-scientists, mathematicians and poets, all find a common subject in language.

Course work will include regular homework exercises, project/tests, and outside readings. Lively participation is required as part of the course.

TEXT: An Introduction to Language 11th ed

 

ENG 371 - Introduction to Rhetorical Analysis

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 101 and junior status.

Introduction to rhetorical theories and analysis.

22054 TR 12:00-1:50 ANDDREW LUCCHESI

Rhetorical Analysis of Comics

In this course, we will investigate the rhetorically rich world of contemporary comic books. We will study the forms and visual rhetoric of graphic storytelling, analyzing a range of examples that experiment with form, medium, and communicative style. We will do more than study published comics, however; we will also experiment with visual composing styles, including drawing and new media storytelling. In other words, not only will you become a better reader of comics and other visual texts, you will also become a more confident creator of comics and other visual texts.

Our central focus will be on the rhetoric and cultural context of contemporary comics. To this end, we will ask questions about how comics circulate; how they come to be written, revised, and published; how they gather audiences, and how they speak to the identities of those audiences (especially queer, female, and non-white audiences); and finally, how comics and visual writing can be used for scholarship within academic settings.

This class welcomes students from all disciplines, and there are no requirements in terms of artistic skill. Anyone wishing to take the course, but who might need accommodation or alternative formats for texts should contact andrew.lucchesi@wwu.edu as early as possible.

Note that this course employs an open, self-directed grading system. You will choose assignments that suit your interests and abilities, and you will make decisions about your own production process (including deadlines). So, be aware that this course will require a great deal of consistent self-motivation.

The only required book for purchase is Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art (any year or edition is fine). This is available at the bookstore. There are also two other required texts that will not be available through the bookstore:

  • Barrier (2017) by Brian K. Vaughan, Marcos Martin and Muntsa Vicente. This is a five-part comic published exclusively online, and sold at a pay-what-you-can price.
  • Three monthly comics subscriptions. The staff at The Comics Place will help you pick comics that match your interests, and you will subscribe to read them every month. Most comics cost $3-4 per issue, and you will be purchasing a total of nine single issues for the class.

 

ENG 385 - Sustainability Literacy II

Prerequisites & Notes: ENVS 116 or ENG 201 or ENG 202.

Advanced instruction and practice in applying systems thinking to writing projects related to the topic of sustainability.

22424 MWF 2:30-3:50 NICOLE BROWN

This class will introduce you to the methodology of systems thinking and will introduce you to the specialized language and tools that encourage us to grasp the ways in which language and discourse— writing ecologies—constructs, sustains, and changes systems. Systems Thinking, as a methodology, can be applied to every context—from professional organizations to plant-based ecologies.


By shifting focus from the parts to the whole, this writing course articulates --the big picture and synthesizes information from many different perspectives and disciplines to address and solve problems. It shifts the focus from analytical thinking to contextual thinking and develops an ecological practice towards the relationship between writing and change in social, ecological, and technological systems.


The course will involve guest presentations from systems change leaders in our local community. This broad spectrum of disciplinary viewpoints will help you develop a unique interdisciplinary approach towards systems thinking and the properties of a viable, desirable, and sustainable future.


Course projects include weekly writing assignments incorporating visual and verbal elements, including experimenting with new media and/or performance-based compositions. For the major project you will be a part of a team that applies a systems thinking approach to a problem or vision within an organization, ecosystem, or other community context you care about. We will use these models to develop and implement policy solutions through written and oral proposals.


You should leave the course with excellent writing samples: systems maps, rhetorical analyses, research displays, and proposals, as well as a new vocabulary and methodology to facilitate systems-based analysis, communication, and change.

 

ENG 400 - Directed Independent Study

Credits: 1-15

An individualized course of study not available through or replacing existing curriculum, to be arranged between one matriculating student and sponsoring faculty member. All academic policies and registration deadlines apply. Directed Independent Study courses cannot substitute for General University Requirements and are not eligible for tuition waiver.

 

ENG 401 - Senior Seminar in Writing Studies and Rhetoric

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 301 or ENG 302 or ENG 370 or ENG 371, or instructor approval; senior status.

Senior writing seminar on the theories and practices of rhetorical genres.

21610 TR 2:00-3:50 JEREMY CUSHMAN

Story-driven podcasts are digital audio pieces readily available for download that are typically serialized and center on a particular theme or idea. Unlike podcasts that feature an interesting, if meandering, conversation between friends, or the more traditional long-form interviews that NPR made famous, story-driven podcasts layer together interview tape, music, sound effects, and scripted monologue. Story-driven podcasting promotes rather unique experiences for us students and teachers—experiences that lead to productively vulnerable and deeply reflexive relationships with rhetoric and writing. So in this class we'll focus on the ways in which story-driven podcast production effectively (and otherwise) intervenes in the knowledge-making practices tethered to intertwining public and digital communication.

We’ll try and surface commonalities in lots of differing story-driven podcasts' overall composition, their tone and attitude, the ways in which they produce (and present) meaning. And, of course, we’ll work to surface differences that make a difference in how particular podcasts express and make meaning. To really dig in and understand what makes a difference in particular podcasts, we’ll also plan, write, re-write, test, write again, and produce our own podcast series. Please don’t feel like you won’t have the technological background (or even savvy) to create work in this course of which you can be proud. The digital tools available to us are easier to pick up than you might imagine, and you’ll have plenty (plenty!) of support. Learning to use tools is fairly straightforward; learning to produce artful, meaning-full compositions takes time and energy.

And to help frame some of these issues that come with building meaning-full story-driven podcasts, we’ll spend a great deal of time working with questions that center on Public Writing & Rhetoric, or what increasingly goes by the name Public Humanities. The ways differing knowledges or possible questions emerge are coextensive (or codependent) with the ways publics form and disperse. What that means is that engaging a public is a rather multilayered, reflexive practice that is much harder to pin down than it might first appear. (If indeed such practices can be “pinned down” at all!) What gathers publics is what gathers value, and how publics are gathered and addressed involves much more than our own self-conscious will or manipulation. The practices that might emerge from connecting podcasting and public writing & rhetoric, then, can help us ask the kinds of questions that cut across both the humanities and the sciences in much the same way that many popular podcasts do.

One of my favorite marketing descriptions of the popular story-driven podcast Planet Money goes something like this: “Imagine calling up a friend and asking them to meet you at a bar so you can talk all about how the 21st century economy works. Now imagine that such a conversation is actually fun.” What I find so compelling in that simple description is the subtle admission that folks want to engage in difficult issues and understand topics that are way outside their expertise. Maybe more importantly, they don’t want to be experts at all; instead, and I think most of us experience this, they want to connect to complex issues and sprawling ideas in meaningful ways. In a “postmodern” climate (for lack of better phrase) where knowledges take precedence over capital ‘K’ Knowledge and where the whole is subordinated to the parts, public engagement is still what people desire even if they don't know what it means. Podcasting, I think, turns out to be an interesting and useful response to such an understandable desire.

 

ENG 410 - Studies in Literary History

Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 202 plus three from: ENG 304-347, ENG 364, ENG 370, ENG 371.

A wide variety of studies in literary history. Repeatable once as an elective with different topics.

CS201 Assignment Instructions:

Please read the following instructions carefully before submitting assignment:
It should be clear that your assignment will not get any credit if:
  • Assignment is submitted after due date.
  • Submitted assignment does not open or file is corrupt.
  • Assignment is copied (From internet/students).

CS201 Assignment Objectives:

To enable students to understand and practice the concepts of:
  • Variables and operators
  • Expressions in C++
  • Decision structures
  • Repetition structures

CS201 Assignment Submission Instructions:

You have to submit only .cpp file on the Assignments interface of CS201 at VULMS. Assignment submitted in any other format will not be accepted and will be graded zero marks.

Software allowed to develop Assignment:

Recommended :DevC++ Installation and Usage Complete Guidelines

CS201 Assignment No 1

Write a program that will Ask the user to enter lower limit and upper limit in the form of integer numbers.
The program will then add / sum all those numbers between upper limit and lower limit (including the lower and upper limits) which are NOT multiple of 4.
This process should continue for all the remaining integer numbers up until the upper limit is reached.
The program will then show the aggregate sum of all numbers for the given range.

Make sure that lower limit entered by the user should be greater than zero. Also the upper limit value entered by the user should be greater than the lower limit value.

Example:
Lower limit is 1 and Upper limit is 8 then the program will subtract 4 and 8 as these are the multiples of 4. While add remaining integers in the range (1+2+3-4+5+6+7-8 = 12). So, 12 is the calculated number.

CS201 Assignment No 1 Solution


#include<iostream>#include<stdlib.h>usingnamespace std; intmain() { int upperlmt, lowerlmt, sum=0,a; cout<<"please enter lower limit greater then zero="; cin>>lowerlmt; if (lowerlmt>0) { cout<<"please enter upper limit greater than lower limit="; cin>>upperlmt; if (upperlmt>lowerlmt) { for(a=lowerlmt; a<=upperlmt; a++) { if(a%4==0) { sum=sum-a; } else { sum=sum+a; } } cout<<"calculated number is="<<sum; } else { cout<<"upper limit must be greater than lower limit"; } } else { cout<<"lower limit should be greater then zero"; } system("pause"); return0; }

Assignment Solution Source Code Output

You can see the Sample output of Cs201 Assignment Solution Source code in image given below. it works fine. Please test it in your compiler before submitting the Assignment.

CS201 Assignment Solution Source Code Sample Output

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